European Leadership Award 2012

European Voice is announcing its intention to make an award to recognise outstanding leadership in the European Union: the European Leadership Award 2012.

Those shortlisted are Mario Draghi, the president of the European Central Bank, Angela Merkel, the chancellor of Germany, Mario Monti, the prime minister of Italy, Radek Sikorski, the foreign minister of Poland, and Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European Council.

Click here to read more and VOTE.

Meet Robert Kalinák, Slovakia’s deputy prime minister who (sometimes) knows the value of being contrite.
(Cartoon by Marco Villard.)
Tomorrow’s front page today. Cover article: Van Rompuy seeks to sway Hollande over fiscal treaty

Tomorrow’s front page today. Cover article: Van Rompuy seeks to sway Hollande over fiscal treaty

Meet Morten Bødskov, Denmark’s refined law-man.
Cartoon by Marco Villard.

Meet Morten Bødskov, Denmark’s refined law-man.

Cartoon by Marco Villard.

In a genuinely open, merit-based contest, the 25-member executive board’s deliberations should have been preceded by debates between the candidates. I suspect that Okonjo-Iweala, with her enormous competence and renowned wit, would have got the better of Kim. The world would also have seen why so many of us were rooting for her.
Tomorrow’s front page today (26 April-2 May). Cover article: Borrell forced to resign over energy interests.

Tomorrow’s front page today (26 April-2 May). Cover article: Borrell forced to resign over energy interests.

It is beginning to look like Bahrain’s ruling family has calculated correctly that its close allies in Washington, London, and Brussels do not care enough about al-Khawaja to risk challenging al-Khalifa hard-liners and their Saudi allies by publicly pushing for his release or by making clear that Bahrain’s continued stonewalling will have a price.
Lotte Leicht of Human Rights Watch, on the plight of Abdulhadi al-Khawaja.
Tomorrow’s front page today (12-18 April). Lead article: Job creation ambitions hit by eurozone woes

Tomorrow’s front page today (12-18 April). Lead article: Job creation ambitions hit by eurozone woes

The selection of a successor to Robert Zoellick as president of the World Bank was supposed to initiate a new era of open meritocratic competition, breaking the traditional hold that the United States has had on the job. Indeed, Zoellick’s own appointment was widely regarded as ‘illegitimate’ from that perspective. But US President Barack Obama has let the world down even more distressingly with his nomination of Jim Yong Kim for the post.

It may seem strange, but the EU sees itself as a soldier of the common good. Why is a group of countries whose share in worldwide CO2 emissions is only 12% – and set to decline fast – aspiring to global leadership on the issue, despite US inaction and emerging-market countries’ reluctance to commit to binding emission-reduction targets?

In part, the EU’s stance reflects the preferences of European public opinion. In part, it arises from internal politics: to press ahead with its agenda enables the EU to strengthen its hand vis-à-vis the member states. In part, there is the hope that by moving fast, Europe will acquire a comparative advantage in low-carbon technologies.